Far be it from God to do wickedness, and from the Almighty to do wrong.
—Job 34:10

Admittedly, it is difficult to reconcile God’s absolute control over His
creation with His inherent goodness. If we accept the existence of God
and the reality of evil, then we must conclude that a God who would
allow tragedies is either evil or impotent. Yet neither conclusion is a viable
alternative.

The Bible attests to the goodness of God, who is defined by His love for
righteousness and hatred of evil in verses such as “Good and upright is the
Lord” (Psalm 25:8); “O taste and see that the Lord is good” (Psalm 34:8);
and “God is love” (1 John 4:8).

Even apart from the Bible, the world is filled with evidence of a benevolent
Creator. Yes, natural disasters kill people, but most of the time, rivers stay
in their banks and the tectonic plates do not shift. Farmers periodically
struggle with droughts, but usually sufficient rains come to protect their
livelihood and provide our food. We read of crimes committed against
people, forgetting the reason they are reported is that such crimes are the
exception rather than the rule. The outpouring of financial support and
volunteering to help victims of natural disasters and tragedies are reflections
of the goodness of God, in whose image we are made.

The reason we are so surprised, upset, and confused by natural disasters,
illnesses, and crimes is that such calamities are the exception rather than
the norm. But even if all the good things we experience were negated by
an equal amount of bad things, one could not logically use those difficulties
to disprove the existence of a loving God. The case for a benevolent, allpowerful
God would be just as strong as the case against such a God.

When suffering strikes, some people try to comfort themselves with the
thought, “God would have stopped this from happening had He been
able.” But does belief in a God with limited power offer any real hope?
When adversity comes raging into your life, the only protection you have
is the assurance that there is a God surrounding you who controls both the
intensity and direction of your suffering. Otherwise, you and I are merely
victims of random events.

Fortunately, the Bible assures us of God’s absolute control over all His
creation: “You can do all things, and that no purpose of Yours can be
thwarted” (Job 42:2); “The Lord has established His throne in the heavens,
and His sovereignty rules over all” (Psalm 103:19); “Our God is in the
heavens; He does whatever He pleases” (Psalm 115:3). God’s control over
His creation extends into every detail of your life as well.